Shabbos Bulletin Sukkos 5778

Shabbos Bulletin Sukkos 5778

Tefilla Halacha

Making a new “layshayv baSukkah” when going to a friend’s Sukkah is quite complicated. There are many opinions (including Rav Moshe Feinstein and Rav Shlomo Zalmon Aurbach) that a berachah should be made even if nothing is eaten (according to all shittos). Others argue.

That is without a previous berachah in one’s own Sukkah.

If one goes from his Sukkah to a friend’s Sukkah, there is an entirely different shaylah of making a new berachah.

If one had in mind that he would be going when he made his original berachah, MB rules not to make a new berachah.

If he did not have this in mind:

  • MB seems to rule to avoid that situation
  • Rav Elyashiv ruled no berachah
  • Shevet HaLevi ruled to make a berachah
  • If Rav Malinowitz were forced to rule, he would rule to make a berachah.

Lema’aseh, Rav Malinowitz says to read over the first paragraph. And so if you go a friend’s sukkah after making a “layshayv baSukkah” in your own sukkah without any particular thought of going to this new sukkah:

  • If you eat a shiur of mezonos which requires a berachah in a Sukkah, make a new berachah.
  • If you don’t eat a shiur of mezonos, then don’t make a new berachah.

Shabbos Bulletin Yom Kippur 5778

Shabbos Bulletin Yom Kippur 5778

Tefilla Halacha

Yom Kippur is the climax of the 40-day period which started in Elul.

Neilah is the climax of the day of Yom Kippur.

Neilah, as its name implies, is the closing of the gates of Heaven, the final judgment.

This is the time to reverse evil decrees.

Despite the weariness or lack of strength at the end of the day, at the end of the fast, one should arouse oneself to daven with intense concentration and emotion, and with resolve to improve in the coming year.

Shabbos Bulletin Rosh Hashanah and Parshas Haazinu 5778

Shabbos Bulletin Rosh Hashanah and Parshas Haazinu 5778

Tefilla Halacha

The Shulchan Aruch states that on RH and YK the custom is to daven (meaning Shemoneh Esrai) in a loud voice (to have more kavana). The MB adds: “but not too loud. And we are not afraid (with the ‘normal’ loud) that other mispallelim will become confused, because most people have machzorim.”

But the Matteh Efrayim states that many Gedolim were against the minhag of davening (Shemoneh Esrai) loudly, and it is better to daven in a whisper (loud enough to just be able to hear oneself), similar to the rest of the year. Perhaps a bit of a louder whisper for more kavanah, but not enough that your neighbor can hear you. The Shelah writes similarly.

Common custom seems to be like the Matteh Efrayim, but one should not protest someone who davens loudly. If it is really disturbing (not just that you are not used to someone doing that, so it sounds funny to you), talk to them after davening.

Shabbos Bulletin Parshas Nitzavim-Vayeilech 5777

Shabbos Bulletin Parshas Nitzavim-Vayeilech 5777

Tefilla Halacha

Ashkenazim have different נוסחאות for selichos:

  • Minhag Lita
  • Minhag Polin
  • Minhag Medinas Ashkenaz

Each Shul has the nussach it follows.

If an individual is davening סליחות in a place which is saying a nussach which is NOT the one he usually uses, he must still join in and say the nussach of the tzibbur with which he is davening. If he davens in his regular tzibbur the next day and finds that they are saying one or two selichos which are a repetition of what he said the previous day, he must still say them again with this tzibbur.

Shabbos Bulletin Parshas Ki Savo 5777

Shabbos Bulletin Parshas Ki Savo 5777

Tefilla Halacha

When performing gelilah:

  • The sefer Torah should be closed at a point where 2 pieces of parchment are sewn together.
  • The sefer Torah should be closed tightly.
  • One should not touch the parchment with bare hands. If the parchment droops, it should be tightened by grasping it with a tallis or the cloth.
  • The Bereishis side should be higher than the Devarim side.
  • The sash should be knotted or closed on the front side of the sefer, to facilitate its opening when the Torah is next used.